Having bad neighbours isn’t only incredibly stressful, but new research has shown that they can affect the sale of a property. With buyers smartening up, they are on the lookout for signs of potentially problematic neighbours. The research from GoCompare has shown that 28% of Brits have fallen out with a neighbour, with the most common reasons being rubbish, pets and noise.

Loud music, banging doors and shouting take top position, where 40% claim this to be the main cause of the fallout, followed by 25% stating the cause to be barking dogs and fouling, and finally, 16% falling out over rubbish being left in the garden.

Additionally, 4% have fallen out over a parking space, 13% due to overgrown hedges and trees, 10% over damage to a car or property, 11% over maintenance to a boundary line and 10% over a boundary dispute. When you want to carry out any building work on or near a boundary, you need to inform any neighbours whose properties might be affected. Here at Martin Perry Associates, we can advise you on any party wall or boundary issues you may have, and assist you with any Exeter planning applications, as well as those in the rest of Devon and Cornwall.

The research has revealed how this can actually affect the sale of properties. It also found that 48% of buyers would be put off a potential sale if there is rubbish in the gardens of neighbouring homes. This led to the research stating that 43% would not purchase a property if any of the neighbouring homes were in a dilapidated state, and 37% would not buy a home next door to a property let to students.

However, the research showed that many neighbours get along really well and help each other when they are in need, and half of those said they would refer to their neighbours as a friend, with 51% saying that they have lent to a neighbour and 42% have borrowed from them. Additionally, 51% would look after their neighbour’s property if they went away and feed their pets or water the plants.

Ben Wilson, GoCompare’s home insurance spokesperson, said:

“Most people get along well with their neighbours; however, not all neighbours are easy to live next to. If you have an issue with a neighbour, the first thing you should do is to have a friendly chat with them, as they may be completely unaware of any upset they are causing.

“If you’re unable to resolve the matter amicably, depending on the cause of the dispute, there are a number of options available to you. Citizens Advice have a useful step by step guide on the action you can take, and your home insurance may provide valuable help as well,” he explained.

“What’s also worth noting, anyone looking to sell their property is legally required to disclose information about any disputes they’ve had with neighbours on the ‘Seller’s Property Information Form’ provided by their solicitor. Providing false or omitting information could lead to legal action taken against you by the buyers, so honesty is the best policy”.